Regional Homeland Security Coordinating Committee

This site was created in cooperation with the Regional Homeland Security Coordinating Committee, and is supported by funding from the Department of Homeland Security.

 

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Emergency alert system delivers warnings directly to cell phones

Emergency management officials know that in weather emergencies, such as tornados, warnings can save lives. But they can’t always rely on traditional warning methods — television, radio and outdoor sirens — to reach everyone. Through a partnership with FEMA’s Integrated Public Alert and Warning System, officials are now able to send warnings directly to cell phones. Using the Wireless Emergency Alert (WEA) system, the National Weather Service will send warnings for tornados, flash floods, blizzards and ice storms in the Kansas City area to cell towers that serve affected counties. The warnings will go automatically to any newer-model cell phones within range of the towers. Learn more>


Weather Radios Save Lives

Unlike outdoor sirens, all-hazards radios save lives by alerting people who are indoors when severe weather approaches. They can also alert people in homes, schools and businesses to other types of emergencies. These radios provide constant, useful and up-to-date weather information. They are equipped with a special alarm tone that will sound an alert and give immediate information in a life-threatening situation.

Project Community Alert (PCA) is a community-wide effort to distribute weather alert radios. The Metropolitan Emergency Managers Committee (MEMC) has partnered with Price Chopper grocery stores to sell the radios at a special price, $29.95. To locate a store near you, visit www.mypricechopper.com and click on "Store Locator."


Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Carbon monoxide is commonly known as “the silent killer.” Because it is colorless, odorless and tasteless, none of your senses can detect it. CO claims the lives of almost 300 people in their homes each year according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). CO is a potentially deadly gas that is produced by fuel-burning heating equipment, such as furnaces, wood stoves, fireplaces and kerosene heaters. Follow these guidelines to help keep your family safe:


Surviving an Active Shooter Event: Run, Hide, Fight

After the recent shooting at a movie theater in Aurora, Colo., the city of Houston's Mayor's Office of Public Safety and Homeland Security Department prepared this video outlining what you should do if you find yourself in an active shooter situation: run, hide or fight.

The video is a Department of Homeland Security Grant Funded Project, produced by the City of Houston's Mayor's Office of Public Safety and Homeland Security. The City grants permission to use the video in the format provided for its intended purpose only, information and awareness training for the general population.


New national ad campaign: "Winging it is not an emergency plan"

Just in time for September’s National Preparedness Month, the Ad Council has released some humorous new videos on how not to be prepared. After a fun look at what not to do, the ads encourage parents to talk with their children about who to call, where to meet and what to pack in an emergency, and send viewers to www.ready.gov/kids for more information.

Watch for these new ads on local TV stations, or view them now on You Tube:


Disaster and Preparedness video series

In part two of the "Disaster Place Theater" video series, our characters focus on what to do — and what not to do — during a fire. This video is part of a series that focuses on the different types of responses necessary for different emergencies. The series, produced by the Greater Kansas City Metropolitan Emergency Managers Committee, is designed to share important information in a fun, memorable way.


Do you have an emergency plan?

Are you and your family prepared for an emergency? If phone lines were down, if cell phones didn't work, if you couldn't get to the grocery store for a few days -- what would you do? If you had to evacuate -- where would you go?

Disasters can happen anytime and anywhere. When disaster strikes, you may not have much time to respond. The time to plan for a disaster is now, before it happens.


Need more information? Contact your emergency manager>>